Friday, June 09, 2017

Universal Background Checks & Waiting Periods

This is what happens when you drop your guard!

There's been a bit of a kerflunkle on the Internet regarding superstar trainer Pat MacNamara's apparent support of a waiting period and universal background checks. So much so that MacNamara's video publisher, Panteao [with whom I have occasionally produced video, so be aware of that] felt obligated to answer the charges on AR15.com.

Frankly, we crucified Dick Metcalf and Jim Zumbo for a lot less.

Without going into MacNamara's sterling service to America as a legend in special forces, I want to, rather, specifically address what is wrong with "universal background checks" and "waiting periods." Let me sum it up very clearly — there is no such thing as "universal background checks" or "crimes of passion" prevented by a waiting period of any length. Both concepts are purely the creation of our blood enemies to incrementally rob us of our rights.

Regardless of who you are, if you accept the premise of either of those comments, you are playing into the hands of people who wish to destroy us. It is no different than saying, "You know, ISIS has a few good points if you look hard enough." Maybe they do, and there are indeed people who like cockroaches, too.

The concept of a "universal background check" has been thoroughly co-opted by what one might call the "Bloomberg Model" antigun legislation. We have extensive legal experience with the Bloomberg Model from our ultimately unsuccessful fight against it in Colorado. The Bloomberg Model, which is quite literally the only thing on the table, has nothing to do with "universal background checks." Instead, it seeks to criminalize numerous activities that gunowners have engaged in for decades, maybe centuries. The intent is to is a major attack on the gun culture itself. It does this by first off changing the definition of transfer.

Since its inception, ATF has defined a "transfer" as a "transfer of ownership," essentially the dictionary accepted definition of a transfer…I sell, trade, transfer ownership of a weapon to you. The Bloomberg Model replaces the common sense meaning of "transfer" with a completely different definition of of the word, "transfer of possession." Under the Bloomberg Model, if I hand you a gun, I have completed a "transfer;" to do so legally I need to have that simple action performed by an FFL. When you had the gun back to me, it needs to be done through an FFL. If we fail to include an FFL for both "transfers," we are guilty of Federal felonies.

This is a brilliant attack on the gun culture. Typically, we spread the culture by contact…I say this as the creator and manager of the NSSF Media Education Program, where I took antigun journalists to the range and taught them to shoot. It works, and it is how we spread our culture. By criminalizing that simple act, we find ourselves stymied, prevented from doing the very activities. we all took for granted the day before. "Universal background checks" are a weapon to destroy us!

To the best of my knowledge, every single "universal background check" initiative is based on the Bloomberg Model. Let me say that again — EVERY UNIVERSAL BACKGROUND CHECK INITIATIVE IS BASED ON THE BLOOMBERG MODEL AND FUNDED BY BLOOMBERG SHELL ORGANIZATIONS. It clear enough for you? If you support such an initiative, you are siding with the Bloomberg machine against the NRA, against gun owners and ultimately against your own self-interest.

Ditto for the "crimes of passion" argument. The idea of a "crime of passion" is that a perfectly normal person is suddenly turned into a killer by the sudden rush of hormones, grabs (or races to the LGS, obtains a gun and shoots up, murders, whatever. In looking at the so-called "crimes of passions" over the years, especially examining them for THE BEST DEFENSE, instead of "perfectly normal people," what we repeatedly see is felons doing what felons do. In scratching the surface of crimes of passion we instead see long-term histories of petty crime, spousal abuse, escalating violence. "Crimes of passion" was originally a phrase applied to "hot-blooded peoples" like Hispanics and blacks, who allegedly were unable to control their passions. It was a lie then and it is a lie now.

Once again, to buy into the enemies' argument, to agree to the ememies' warping of language, is to play the enemies' game. If you play the enemies' game, you lose. We lose.

We have stopped losing in recent years because we have stopped playing the enemies' games. We choose the fight, we choose the battlefield, we reject the language of the enemy. That is how we win.

Because the pressure has been lifted with the election of Donald Trump and the seating of Neil Gorsuch on the Supreme Court, there's a tendency to drop our guard.

I would ask any one of my friends who served in special forces on any one of the far-flung hellholes we sent them to, what are the consequences of dropping your guard?






Sunday, June 04, 2017

Hi! I'm Back!

Well, sorta…for the next couple of months I will be in and out of the country like a yo-yo on a very long string. Every place I'm going says they have wi-fi…more or less…often less than more. I'll do my best, either here on on Facebook (https://m.facebook.com/michael.bane.395), which is sometimes easier from a phone.


On London…I got nothing…if you choose to be sheep, you will be led to the slaughter. London is probably my favorite city in the whole world; I have my favorite restaurants, my favorite pubs, the British Museum. But let's be honest here. England is a country that made a profound choice, to make violence the exclusive property of the State. Even in clear-cut incidences of self-defense, the State has maintained that monololy. ONLY THE STATE CAN EXERCISE VIOLENCE, and there are no exceptions.

The problem with this mindset, this legal determination, is that it requires everyone to accept that ruleset. Enter Islam, a 7th Century warrior sect whose founding principle can be summed up as "Islam or death." When 2 rulesets collide, the most vigorous — the most violent — will inevitably prevail.

The endless "We can't let the terrorists win by changing our lifestyle, our ruleset," memes are patent nonsense. Islam's violence has already changed us and changed our country and our culture…every time we step though the security theatre of TSA, every time we go to a public place, we feel those effects.  And in England, we see the effects of cascading failures.

I thought this article from John Moody at Fox is telling:
For far too long, Western societies, including in the United States, have tried to rationalize what has now become an avalanche of violent hatred of democratic freedom, basic human rights, and freedom to choose if and how to worship. We have asked if some of this is our fault, if we haven’t listened to the voices of religious extremism, or if we have failed to understand their message. The result in Britain: government officials estimate there are more than 20,000 jihadists living among the population. 
Here’s their message: We hate you and want to kill you.
That's why I got nothing on London, or Manchester, or the other Ramadan deaths around the world. The International Left, regardless of country, has made there choice to stand with the terrorists, the murderers of children, the beheaders, the destroyers of our shared past. Illegal immigrants now have a legal status higher than American citizens Don't believe me? Here in Colorado our Governor, always mentioned in the same breath as a potential Democratic Presidential candidate, pardoned a violent felon to keep him from being deported.

Why?

I'm pretty sure Governor Hickenlooper would not take such a drastic action in my behalf. Yet we have the spectacle of mayors and even governors around the country standing up and saying they are will to bend, or ignore, America laws in favor of people who shouldn't be here at all.

Islam in its most violent manifestation is an existential threat to our lives specifically because it bends the State around its bloody fingers. It allows the State to grow in the direction it has always desired — more intrusion, more surveillance,  more control. The reason we see statements like the Muslim mayor of London or Barack Obama or the French leaders that terrorism is "just one of those things," like a tornado or a garbage strike, is that terrorism ultimately works in their favor, e.g., they get what they want by having a small percentage of their citizens slaughtered by the ghosts of Islam's past.

For those of us wandering around the slaughterhouse who may take issue with that prevailing wisdom, there is but one certainty — WE ARE ON OUR OWN!

Don't worry…the power of the State will be arriving in 8 minutes...



Saturday, April 08, 2017

Haven't Much Been in the Mood to Write


Well, actually that's not completely true…I'm scripting for GUN STORIES WITH JOE MANTEGNA, so I'm spending 6-8 hours a day in front of the computer working. Given all the personal stuff that's been whirling around, it's hard to build up a lot of enthusiasm to tackle the laptop after I shut down the desktop.

Plus, it appears there's been a massive reduction of IQ in the various social media, and wading through the crap just makes me tired and bored. I can't even gin up the enthusiasm to be snide. OTOH, I've been shooting alot, mostly the new Ruger Mk IV Competition, but also some of the bigger boomers. I'm getting my Ruger American .450 Bushmaster ready for a SHOOTING GALLERY episode later in the year. Also started moving rounds through my .22 bolt action rifle, to try for some kind of tune-up for Africa.

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! As you can see from the above photo, my Magnum Research BFR 45-70 is now home! I'm probably going to take it out this afternoon and continue striving for carpal tunnel syndrome. First off, let me say that the BFR is a superbly made gun [WARNING: Kahr Arms is a sponsor]! This is my first BFR…as I think you guys know I am a connoisseur — or co-nigh-zee-eer, if you live in the South or Detroit or South Detroit, for that matter — of single action revolvers. I have a lot of them, both production and custom, have shot a lot of them in many many different flavors over the years and irrationally love them all. The first gun I ever shot as a little kid was a Ruger Bearcat .22 single action. The first centerfire handgun I ever fired was a Flattop Blackhawk in .357. The first ammunition I ever reloaded went into that Blackhawk. So there.

The BFR is a pleasant surprise. For a beast of a gun, it has a certain proletarian beauty. Machining is top-notch, the trigger pull is a crisp couple of pounds, the sights are excellent and I like the new BFR gripframe, always a touchy thing for single action aficionados…if you want to start a bar fight at a gather of SA fans, bring up plough-handle vs. Bisley, then stand back. I generally don't like rubber grips on a boomer, but the Hogues on the 45-70 are pretty nice, and I suppose I'll be happy with anything that soaks up a little recoil. I'm willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. If not, Jack Huntington does a really great looking modification of the BFR gripframe and knows as much about boomers as any living man except Lee Martin…he built a short-barrelled BFR in 50-110, a caliber which I have shot to the detriment of my shoulder in a Sharps!

To be fair, I have shot 45-70 revolvers before, both the old canon-bronze framed Century 100s, an  early BFR (3 shots!), and a 10-inch T/C single shot I had custom built by J.D. Jones, so I'm unlikely to burst into flames on the first shot. In fact, as long as you're using sane loads, the recoil is not nearly as brutal as, say, a .500 Linebaugh or even a .454 Casull, which has a much sharper recoil wave. I plan to start with 405-gr "Trapdoor Safe" loads, then probably move up to Hornady 325-gr Leverevolutions, which I keep on hand for the Ruger #1. I suppose I can build up to Ashley Emerson's dinosaur-killers after a bit. 
Few other interesting tidbits…Standard Manufacturing is now cataloging their color casehardened, engraved 1911 for $1895. That's a good price for such a great-looking 1911! I handled these at SHOT and was very impressed. Considering that Standard/CT Shotguns builds $100k+ shotguns, they are masters at their craft. 

Greg Ellifritz at Active Response Training has an interesting article on "deep deep concealment," carrying a weapon in non-permissive — not illegal, mind you — environment. Definitely word a read! Here's his points on non-metallic knives:
When dealing with a walk through metal detector, these tactics won’t work. In the event that I have to go through one of those, I will carry my ceramic Talonz knife (after replacing the metal dog tag chain with a short piece of paracord) or my G-10 composite copy of the same Fred Perrin knife I mentioned earlier. Neither of these are detectable by any metal detectors. 
I would urge anyone trying to carry plastic, ceramic, or composite knives through a metal detector to verify that they are truly metal free. Some companies insert a small amount of metal in the blades or handles just so people can’t sneak them through metal detectors. Pick up a portable metal detecting wand. The ones most security officers use are fairly cheap. You can pick one of those up for less than $25 on Amazon.com (affiliate links). Better safe than sorry.
So I took his advice. I have one of the carbon fiber versions of the Fred Perrin La Griffe, in addition to the steel version, that I figured should be just as invisible as Greg's G-10 version. I also have a Stone River Gear ceramic neck knife that I was curious about. I called my friends at Tall Guns, who train security guards among other things, to ask if I could bring the 2 knives over an run a wand over them.

We all agreed that the carbon fiber La Griffe was going to be a slam dunk…it is beautiful made, weights just next to nothing and, surprise, lit up the metal detector like a Christmas tree. We were very careful to keep the knife away from its sheath, which has metal rivets, and any other metal. For whatever reason, the little carbon fiber La Griffe Carbone will definitely set off a metal detector! Good to know. I ordered one of the G-10 versions, which I'll check before I use it in an environment where I might be wanded or have to walk through a metal detector.
The Stone River ceramic neck knife (above), which we expected to set off the metal detector, instead passed with flying colors. I suggest you take Greg's advice and verify that your own non-metallic weapons are really as invisible as you think they are!


Friday, March 31, 2017

Great News From Apex Tactical!


The world's greatest trigger manufacturer take customization to a whole new level!!!

From tomorrow's presser:

New Apex Gunsmith Fit Universal Trigger


Apex is proud to introduce the all new Red Anodized Gunsmith Fit Universal Trigger, the one replacement trigger for all (or most) of your custom trigger needs.

What It Does
An industry first, the Apex Gunsmith Fit Universal Trigger is designed to provide what no other trigger does, and that’s offer the end user maximum versatility in a custom replacement trigger. Whether you’re working on a Beretta, Colt, Glock, Sig, Smith & Wesson, Springfield, Ruger or Taurus, the Apex Gunsmith Fit Universal Trigger directly replaces the factory trigger with a bright red type 2 anodized solid aluminum trigger body. Requires extensive gunsmithing depending on model trigger and performance features desired.

Expected Results
– Reduces trigger pull by approximately as much as you’d like it to
– Smooth uptake and reset, assuming you do it right
– Reduces pre-travel, over-travel and reset (same assumption as above)

Applicable To What Gun(s)
Works with nearly all pistols, in any caliber, with factory interchangeable triggers.
Does NOT work in Bryco, Hi-Point, Jennings, Lorcin, Raven, Star or similar handguns (because, well, Apex).

Features & Specifications
– It's a pretty shade of Red
– Block expertly tumbled prior to anodizing to provide that smooth-to-the-touch feel
– Requires extensive machining, so grab that Dremel Tool and have at it

In The Package
1 ea. Red Anodized Gunsmith Fit Universal Trigger (in block form)

Installation Resources
There are none. So, good luck with that.

DISCLAIMER

Hello, McFly, this is not an actual trigger and will not work. However, it is actually available for purchase at ApexTactical.com for just $9.95.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Update on Projects


Thought you guys might like to see the progress on my Ruger Mk IV — the grips have been changed from the target grips to a standard set from ShopRuger, a rail has been mounted and the C-More bolted into place. I just started shooting it, and I'll fill you in on accuracy details, hopefully this afternoon after my fun and exciting appointment with the dentist!

On other projects, the Ruger American Ranch Rifle in .450 Bushmaster is definitely going with us to Ox Ranch in Texas for an episode of SHOOTING GALLERY (Shooting tanks and shooting hogs, c'mon! What could be cooler?). Right now it's fitted with a Leupold VX-Hog 1-4X, but I have a sneaking suspicion that a Nightforce NXS 1-4X is in my future!

As I mentioned on Facebook, I am going to tentatively pass on the Ruger GSR in .450 Bushmaster, although it is a beautiful rifle and very true to Jeff Cooper's concept of "Thumper." I've just had a flood of "non-standard" guns/cartridges over the last few months — my .338 Federal Scout and Wilson AR-10, the .458 SOCOM Wilson Combat I built, the .50AE Desert Eagle and the .450 Bushmaster — and a mixed lot of guns coming through the Bunker, so I'm already behind. Besides, now that I've "dialed in" the Ranch Rifle, I'm wondering if I actually need another Thumper!


Friday, March 10, 2017

Okay...Only A Bunch More Conference Calls and I've Made It to the Weekend...

A bunch of wrap-up thingies for the week...

1) Mo' Rugers! Mo' Rugers! Mo' Rugers! Ruger has announced an American .45 Compact. I like the compact 9mm a lot, so I would expect this one to be every bit as good. I assume Brother Ed Head has a review spinning up for DRTV. Ruger also announced 2 more versions of their MK IV .22 pistols, a 22/45 Tactical, based on the upgraded model with the removable grip panels, and a MK IV Competition, which I have on the way to me this week.

This is the pistol I alluded to on Wednesday's podcast. Am looking forward to shoot more Rimfire Challenge this year, and after shooting the Mk IV Hunter version for SHOOTING GALLERY this season, I really want to put the Competition model through the paces. Should be here today or early next week.

It will be fitted with an RDS for this season...

2) Here's Version 3.0 of my EDC:


You may ask yourself why so many versions. Valid question. Just before a match I tanked my untankable Trij RMR06 on my competition USPSA Carry Optics gun. By tanked I mean it stopped holding zero and battery life dropped to minutes...obviously a sick puppy! Plan A was to pop an RMR off one of my other guns, bolt it onto the Suarez G19 I compete with and be good to go. Then Mr. Ham-Hands himself stripped one of the screws holding the RMR in place (Oh come on! Don't you dare tell me you've never stripped a little screwhead!).

Rather than stick with my original plan of screaming and pulling my hair out, I shifted gears on EDC back to my RMR-equipped G26 (not exactly a huge change, to be sure, since my EDC has a G26-sized frame anyway...I didn't even have to change magazines), pulled the slide off the EDC G19 — a very old Glock slide fitted with a first generation Leupold DeltaPoint, and went to the match.

I had always intended to go to a different slide/optic on the ROBAR-build frame, but it was on the back burner. Since I had pieces of Glock scattered all over the place, I decided to move that plan up. I talked to Gabe Suarez and had Suarez International build me up one of their G19 slides in grey with an RMR06 and stacked night sights front and rear. I added a stock barrel and recoil spring assembly. I'll start testing on it today. Once I get around 200 rounds though it, I'll place it into service. BTW, here's a great round-up of Glock barrels from the Victory Gun Blog. I run a Wilson Combat barrel in the competition G19, and it is noticeably different, especially with the Wilson Signature 125-gr Match ammo. If the barrels ever come back into stock, I might even buy a spare! LOL!

And yes, any RDS-equipped firearm that I use for carry is equipped with BUIS!

3) In our Hand Me the Mallet Department..this left me to fix my ham-handed stupidity on the competition gun. Above all things I hate tapping out screws and bolts, especially little bitty screws and bolts. Amazon to the rescue! I have Craftsman bolt and screw removers, but I took a quick look for something a little smaller. I came across Alden MicroGrabits, cutter on one side, extractor on the other. A little pricey, but it looked like what I was looking for. Boom! easiest extraction I've ever done! These things rock...dentists ought to use them. Will have my Trij boxed up and on the way to service today. Meanwhile, I'll stick with the competition set-up I have now.

4) I'll be doing a little big bore stuff next week, working with .44 Magnum single actions for upcoming SGO episode. I admit that part of this is driven by Max Prasac's book I talked about in a previous post. I realized that it has been a while since I worked with the single action blasters, and I kinda missed it. I'm even itching to do some .44 Magnum reloading...maybe it's spring in the air...or a virus of some kind.


5) And one more gun lust point...heard from Big Horn Armory this morning that they are now offering their achingly beautiful big bore lever guns in a 16-inch barreled Trapper version. This is from the presser:
Trapper carbines retain all of the features of the Models 89, 90 and 90A that have made them a resounding hit with hunters and woodsmen who desire a fast-handling powerful repeating rifle that can deliver multiple shots faster than the traditional bolt-action rifle. Receivers and barrels are made from 17-4 stainless steel CNC machined to the tightest tolerances in the industry. All components are made in the USA and assembled by a well-trained staff of gun makers in Cody, Wyoming. Stocks are made from selected American black walnut superbly fitted to the metalwork and checkered to 20 lpi, capped with a 1-inch recoil pad. The generous finger lever accommodates the largest hands even with gloves. Big Horn Armory rifles have the nearly bomb-proof Skinner Sights aperture adjustable for windage and elevation and a post front sight.
In either .500 S&W Magnum, .460 S&W Magnum or .454 Casull...sigh...it would only make my pre-'64 Winchester 94 30-30 jealous!

Thursday, March 09, 2017

Inexplicably, It's Not Friday


I'm on my second gallon of coffee to see if I can jumpstart my brain. Fingers crossed...

I've started reading my friend Max Prasac's spectacular book, THE GUN DIGEST BOOK OF HUNTING REVOLVERS. Even if you're not interested in handgun hunting, the book is a wealth of information on big bore revolver shooting (and was Max's previous book, BIG BORE HANDGUNS).

Our SHOOTING GALLERY episode on John Linebaugh's annual big bore seminar in Cody, WY, was very popular. I think a lot of shooters (and I'd include myself in that group) are fascinated with shooting the big boomers. As I said on the show, it is undeniably hard — hard to master that giant explosion so close to your face, hard to handle that much recoil, hard to keep your hand and wrist from crumbling into powder after a hard day of the range. Max is one of the great masters of this arcane art, and it helps that he is an excellent writer. For those of us who love the boomers, the photography is breathtaking.


HUNTING REVOLVERS is the second "significant" firearms book to be published recently — the first is Richard Mann's THE SCOUT RIFLE STUDY. I say "significant" because both the books add new information and impressive depth to our understanding of these 2 niche areas.

Considering that Richard is a pecker-headed West Virginia redneck, the SCOUT RIFLE STUDY is pretty much a masterpiece in multimedia…the only thing I can think of to explain this is that Richard is holding a whole bunch of 10-year-old hackers captive in his basement. I'm pretty sure Richard knows everything about Scout Rifles, and like Max, he knows it because he's put a bazillion rounds through them, tried numerous different configurations, and used them for training and hunting around the world.

I tend to default to people who do, as opposed to people who have carefully examined all the significant Internet forums, blogs (including mine), social media and YouTube — and hell, even taken a class! — to arrive at their conclusions. I know I've ranted about this recently, but it popped up in my head again since Marshal and I have been writing checks to purchase T&E guns.  We tend to buy a lot of guns and gear because we're in the business, and the way to really understand a firearm is to shoot it a bunch. A 30- or 90-or even 180-day test and evaluation period will introduce you to a gun or a piece of gear, but you don't really know it.

I figure Max and Richard have spent the bulk of their disposable income for decades buying and shooting the guns they're now writing about. That would be my definition of "expert."